Robert the Bruce’s Grave at Dunfermline Abbey & Queensbury crossing

IMG_4288It’s been quite awhile, about 3 weeks, since I wrote the last blog post about when I attended the Perth Tatoo, visited Scone Palace and drove through the beautiful glens of Perthshire with my tour guide Karen.

In addition, an entire month has passed since I left Perth to go to my next stop in Scotland where I visited my dear friends, Keith & Helen Mitchell. My, my how time flies when you’re having a whole lot of fun!

After visiting with Keith & Helen, I traveled the rest of the way through Scotland down to the borders at Berwick-upon-Tweed. Then I made my way south through England to its southern coast where I turned west and followed the coastline westward to finish up the tour of the United Kingdom with a couple of weeks in Wales on the last leg of my 3n month journey. I continuously moved every day or so and didn’t actually stay in any one spot long enough to have time to devote to blog post entries to describe what I had been seeing and experiencing.

I have since returned home again, just the night before last, am doing my laundry now and finally have time to sit down and be still for a while, allowing me to reflect upon where I’ve been, what I’ve seen and what I’m dying to share with you.

There were so many wonderfully delightful sights and sensational vistas to behold along the travel route I followed fervently.

So, let’s see, where were we? Oh, yes – my last post – being in Perth and attending that wonderful Tattoo in the park with all those men in kilts!

After that entertaining stop, I headed just a short distance south to Livingston near Edinburgh. Upon my arrival, Keith & Helen asked if I would like to visit the Dunfermline Abbey while I was in town. I replied, “Sure! Sounds great!”

Off we went one wonderful afternoon. As luck would have it, I was to experience a very BIG ancestral surprise! Neither Keith nor Helen knew it would be a surprise either. After we arrived, found a handy spot in the car park on the grounds to park the car, and were approaching the stunning ancient architecture on foot, they brought to my attention the stone letters at the top of the cathedral’s tower, ‘King Robert.’

That’s when I exclaimed, “Wow! This place is in honour of Robert the Bruce?!? Thee Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland? He is my 20th great grandfather! This is fantastic! Thank you!”

Robert Bruce King of Scotland I (1274 – 1329)
20th great-grandfather
Marjorie Bruce (1297 – 1316)
daughter of Robert Bruce King of Scotland I
King Robert II Stewart (1316 – 1390)
son of Marjorie Bruce
Robert III King of Scotland Stewart (1337 – 1406)
son of King Robert II Stewart
James I King of Scotland Stewart (1394 – 1437)
son of Robert III King of Scotland Stewart
Lady Annabella Stewart Scotland Countess (1432 – 1509)
daughter of James I King of Scotland Stewart
Alexander Huntly Gordon (1460 – 1523)
son of Lady Annabella Stewart Scotland Countess
Lady Janet Gordon Countess Argyll (1489 – 1530)
daughter of Alexander Huntly Gordon
Archibald 4th Earl of Argyll “Gillespie Roy” Campbell (1508 – 1558)
son of Lady Janet Gordon Countess Argyll
LORD COLIN ARGYLL CAMPBELL (1542 – 1584)
son of Archibald 4th Earl of Argyll “Gillespie Roy” Campbell
Archibald 7th Earl of Argyll “Gruamach” Campbell (1575 – 1638)
son of LORD COLIN ARGYLL CAMPBELL
Lord Archibald Campbell Marquis of Argyll Earl of Argyll (1606 – 1661)
son of Archibald 7th Earl of Argyll “Gruamach” Campbell
Archibald “9th Earl of Argyll” Campbell (1629 – 1685)
son of Lord Archibald Campbell Marquis of Argyll Earl of Argyll
David Daniel Campbell (1675 – 1753)
son of Archibald “9th Earl of Argyll” Campbell
Charles Campbell (1699 – 1767)
son of David Daniel Campbell
William Campbell (1728 – 1803)
son of Charles Campbell
Jeanette Campbell (1770 – 1851)
daughter of William Campbell
John Holliday (1803 – 1872)
son of Jeanette Campbell
Elizabeth “Lizzie” Holiday (1842 – 1872)
daughter of John Holliday
Nancy Anne Brundage (1867 – 1948)
daughter of Elizabeth “Lizzie” Holiday
William Rose Frew II (1885 – 1976)
son of Nancy Anne Brundage
William Kenneth Frew (1917 – 1997)
son of William Rose Frew II
Claudia Louise Frew
You are the daughter of William Kenneth Frew
Each piece of the ancestral puzzle keeps fitting together delightfully one by one as I find them. This piece ties a lot of the loose ends together of other places I have visited previously on this trip. For instance, it brings in the Stewarts and Gordons from my visit to Huntly Castle up in northern Aberdeenshire earlier in the month and also the Campbells from Inverary Castle in Argyll on the west coast which I visited back in June! It also demonstrates how they each relate to one another and down the line to me. That’s so cool!
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Well, we’ve got a lot of exploring to do. Let’s walk around the grounds, look at the outside of this cathedral and the nearby ruined Refectory and then head inside to see what interesting treasures are to be discovered.
It’s quite old, and like many churches I have visited during my travels, it has gone through some changes over the centuries. The Abbey church is the centerpiece of Dunfermline, one of the oldest settlements in Scotland and once its proud capital. The history is entwined with that of Scotland itself, as it was the burial site of the Scottish monarchs before the adoption of the island of Iona which I also had the pleasure to visit earlier this summer in July.
The Abbey and the ruins around it are all that remains of a Benedictine order founded by Queen Margaret in the 11th century. The foundations of her church are under the present nave (or Old Church), built in the twelfth century in the Romanesque style by David I (son of Margaret and Malcolm Canmore).
David I, King of Scotland, is also one of my great grandfathers, 24th to be exact. His relation to me comes from a different lineage than the previous relationship of Robert I who came through my dad’s paternal side of the family. This time the relationship comes down through the Clapp family line, on my dad’s maternal side. Interesting that it ties those two separate lineages over the centuries together to culminate at the generation of my paternal grandparents!
This Clapp lineage includes other previous ancestral discoveries I made when I visited Tolquhon Castle and its’ Forbes ancestral connection earlier in August.
Just gotta love the way the pieces of the puzzle keep fitting together so nicely creating a landscape of interlocking memories of places I’ve been visiting up and down in this blessed land of Scotland and how they each offer something to learn about myself and who I come from bit by bit.
David I King of Scotland (1080 – 1153)
24th great-grandfather
Henry Northumberland Scotland (1114 – 1152)
son of David I King of Scotland
David Etherington Huntingdon Scotland (1144 – 1219)
son of Henry Northumberland Scotland
Lady Isobel “Isabel” MacCrinan of Huntingdon (1190 – 1256)
daughter of David Etherington Huntingdon Scotland
Sir Robert 5th Lord Annandale & Constable to England and Scotland DeBruce (1210 – 1295)
son of Lady Isobel “Isabel” MacCrinan of Huntingdon
Sir Robert VI Lord Annandale DeBruce (1243 – 1304)
son of Sir Robert 5th Lord Annandale & Constable to England and Scotland DeBruce
Maud Matilda deBruce (1275 – 1323)
daughter of Sir Robert VI Lord Annandale DeBruce
Lillias Ross (1329 – 1366)
daughter of Maud Matilda deBruce
Matilda Urquhart Heiress de Troupe (1363 – 1413)
daughter of Lillias Ross
William “Earl Marischal of Scotland” Keith (1389 – 1463)
son of Matilda Urquhart Heiress de Troupe
Gille Egidia Lady Keith (1424 – 1473)
daughter of William “Earl Marischal of Scotland” Keith
Patrick Forbes (1446 – 1476)
son of Gille Egidia Lady Keith
David Forbes (1478 – 1509)
son of Patrick Forbes
Patrick Forbes (1516 – 1554)
son of David Forbes
Sir William, 7th Lord of Tolquhon Forbes (1530 – 1596)
son of Patrick Forbes
John Forbes (1568 – 1635)
son of Sir William, 7th Lord of Tolquhon Forbes
John Fobes (1608 – 1661)
son of John Forbes
Lieut William Fobes (1649 – 1712)
son of John Fobes
Phebe Fobes (1679 – 1715)
daughter of Lieut William Fobes
Mary Seabury (1715 – 1755)
daughter of Phebe Fobes
Pvt John Southworth (1743 – 1832)
son of Mary Seabury
Hannah Southworth (1796 – 1842)
daughter of Pvt John Southworth
Hannah Mae Case (1828 – 1898)
daughter of Hannah Southworth
Daniel A Clapp (1853 – 1913)
son of Hannah Mae Case
Hannah Elizabeth Clapp (1897 – 1977)
daughter of Daniel A Clapp
William Kenneth Frew (1917 – 1997)
son of Hannah Elizabeth Clapp
Claudia Louise Frew
You are the daughter of William Kenneth Frew
Alrighty, let’s get back to a little more history… After the Reformation, Dunfermline ceased to be an Abbey, but since the nave of the church continued to be used as the local parish church, much of the Abbey has survived to this day. The present parish church, to the east of the Old Church, was added in the nineteenth century.

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Once inside, we find ourselves inside the Old Church it’s carved columns and arched ceilings frame some absolutely beautiful stained glass windows on either side the length of the time-tested structure spread out before us.

IMG_4315IMG_4534Standing amongst the soaring carved pillars one can get the feeling of how ancient it is and the spirit of the people who’ve been here is in the air like a comforting warm wrapping.

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The windows continue to amaze me with their vivid colors and scenes.

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Well, that just about covers the Old Church, now we’ll go into the newer portion of the old, old, church and where we’ll find the tomb on Robert I, King of Scotland!  Here’s a video I took as I crossed the threshold and began looking around inside…

Now, for the moment I’ve been waiting for, the tomb of Robert I, King of Scotland, my 20th great grandfather!

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It’s a pretty incredible feeling to be standing beside the tomb of such a famous and significant Scottish ancestor. It’s difficult to describe; pride & honor come to mind for starters and the knowledge that this person, who represents one piece, one part, of what I come from is coursing through my being at this very moment.

He’s part of who I am and if just one person anywhere in my varied lineages, such as this person, didn’t exist in that golden ancestral chain, I simply would not exist at all.

Feelings and thoughts such as these serve to remind me that each of us plays our own little tiny little part and that we are connected for an eternity through time and space in this universe through our shared DNA and spirits of life.  IMG_4338

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Nearby in a closed case, there is even a plaster cast of his skull!

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On display near the exit of the church were these very informative interpretive panels set up with the history of his tomb, the church and the restorative work completed. I’ve included them here in case you might like to read and learn about it. Quite interesting…

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The banners hanging from the columns were quite spectacular and I was so pleased to find this handy sign explaining what each one represented – quite an array of nobility and positions!

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Of course, I can’t forget to get a picture of that wonderful organ that has been serenading us in the videos! In fact, the man that was playing the organ that day was a retired pastor of this church. He really played well and enjoyed himself tremendously while doing so.

After we had seen everything there was to see inside, we headed back outside to the churchyard. We had also worked up a bit of an appetite so we worked our way through the sculpture garden located in the corners of the grounds and went upstairs to the abbey cafe overlooking the majestic surroundings as we enjoyed our freshly baked soup and scones.

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IMG_4388IMG_4387IMG_4367After the replenishing meal, we made our way back across the churchyard toward the ruins of the Refectory and the Royal Palace, in the opposite corner of the grounds. The Royal Palace was rebuilt from the guest house of the monastery during the sixteenth century for James VI and his Queen. IMG_4369On our way to the Palace, we passed the east gable of the church which contains the tomb and shrine of St. Margaret. It’s been a place of pilgrimage since medieval times.

The tomb of Saint Margaret and Malcolm Canmore, within the ruined walls of the Lady chapel, was restored and enclosed by command of Queen Victoria.

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This place goes on and on!  It’s incredibly interesting and so full of significant history.

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We will start with what used to be the Royal Palace; three stories high and adjacent to the monks’ refectory.

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In the photo above, the interpretive panel explains how the Palace may have looked in its heydey.  I took a before and after picture of each section on each floor and have arranged them below so you can compare what each portion of the castle may have looked yourself, like the one just below shows the upper right-hand portion of the Palace that would have held the Royal Bed in the bedroom: four embroiderers adorned a special bed for the royal birth with gold and silver threads, green silk and velvet. It was a gift from James to Anna.

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On the 2nd floor below: a Grand window, Anna added this in her 1589 renovations. It gave her a view down over the Tower Burn. Also note the #5 denoting a perilous spiral staircase, in 1602 Roger Aston ‘fell over a pair of high stairs at the Queen’s chamber door where he was taken up dead and so remained for 3 hours.’ A nobleman had already fallen here and ‘dashed out all his brains!’

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The Gallery at number 3: Residents and guests could play music and games here, and exercise in comfort on wet days.

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#4 The Hall: Guests and residents would dine here, and wait to enter the Queen’s presence-chamber next door.

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The kitchens, storage and servants’ quarters were all below ground level.IMG_4464IMG_4465

IMG_4466Now for the other side of these complex and massive ruins – the Refectory…IMG_4298

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It’s been extremely interesting, informative and emotional for me to visit this spectacular iconic treasure.  One more shot before I get back to the car park… I will long remember this place.IMG_4537IMG_4538Our next stop is the Queensferry bridges spanning the wide divide of the Forth estuary from Dunfermline to Edinburgh with particular attention being paid to the red railway bridge, an engineering feat in its own right and had the world’s longest spans (541 m) when it opened in 1890. It remains one of the greatest cantilever trussed bridges and continues to carry passengers and freight.

Its distinctive industrial aesthetic appeal is the result of a forthright and unadorned display of its structural components. Innovative in style, materials and scale, the Forth Bridge marks an important milestone in bridge design and construction during the period when railways came to dominate long-distance land travel. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Two other bridges nearby carry the trucks and cars across the Forth. When the photo below was taken the crews were finishing up the last remaining touches on the newest third bridge as it was due to open in just one week’s time!  The newest bridge is the one furthest away and appears slightly lower in the photo than the older one in the foreground.

IMG_4562We viewed the bridges from Queensferry and then walked through the adjoining neighbourhood surrounding the waterfront, enjoying an ice cream along the way.  What a pretty spot with some very intriguing sights!IMG_4546IMG_4547IMG_4548IMG_4549IMG_4550IMG_4552IMG_4553IMG_4554

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It certainly turned out to be one heck of an ancestral surprise kind of a day and was filled with many beautiful, historical sights with a sweet ending at an old-fashioned Sweet Shop.

I thoroughly enjoyed my time with Keith and Helen but the next day I packed up my belongings once again and to continue on down the road a little further to my next destination, Tantallon Castle & Dewar, making my way to the Scottish Borders on the east coast.  That’s another story, however, for another time in another blog post. Until then…

 

 

 

 

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Author: Claudia Frew

Adventuresome, independent, and fun-loving American 65-year young great-grandmother who loves to travel; often going solo!

2 thoughts on “Robert the Bruce’s Grave at Dunfermline Abbey & Queensbury crossing”

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